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On 1/28/2022 at 11:27 PM, Monsoon said:

Thank you! I would love to go on more hikes.Β 

With the peake district, I recommend doing the 'three ships' walk (I honestly don't know why it is called the 'three ships')

Here is the best route to take:

Β 

1. From the car park go over to Goose Green and then the pedestrian crossing beyond to head up Eaton Hill.

On land to your right once stood Baslow's Grand Hotel and Hydro which was constructed in 1881. It provided hydropathic services even though it is said the local spring water lacked the health-giving minerals of neighbouring spas in the towns of Buxton and Matlock. There were tennis courts, a 9-hole golf course and landscaped gardens, all of which disappeared following the demolition of the building in 1936. Reminders of its existence are the otherwise curiously named Hydro Cottage and Hydro Close.

2. At the junction with a triangular-shaped island, turn right up Bar Road just after a pair of impressive gate posts that formed an entrance to the aforementioned Hydro. Ascend what was long ago the old coach road to Sheffield, passing Lady Wall Well on the left after the last of the houses. This natural water supply would have been where carriage-, cart- and packhorses could take a drink on their long climb to high ground.

3. After passing through a gate to enter moorland on the approach to Baslow Edge, turn right and follow a partly fallen wall and fencing on a path beneath Jack Flatt that leads into woodland scattered with moss-coated rocks lying haphazardly beneath a canopy of corkscrew oak and silver birch.

4. Continue on the path as it descends to cross a narrow bridge over Bar Brook, beside tucked-away houses that are surrounded by wonderful gardens of flowering shrubs and specimen trees.

5. Cross over the A621 Sheffield Road to a stile on the left of the former toll cottage and follow a well-walked footpath beneath Gardom's Edge.

6. Arriving at a gateway and stone post stile, turn left. Keeping the wall on your right, follow a path leading towards the top of Gardom's Edge.

Β 

7. After passing through a narrow stone gateway you will see piles of stones known as the Three Men.

Go over a wall stile on your right to enter access land and head toward Birchen Edge keeping a wall on your right. To your left is an area of beautiful mature silver birch trees with 'bonsai' baby birch in the foreground.

Β 

8. Just beyond a very large gritstone rock you will find a good path. Turn right and follow this for an easier route to the Robin Hood pub. Alternatively, go straight ahead on a narrow path to the trig point on Birchen Edge and turn right to visit Nelson's Monument and the Three Ships standing stones. The detour path eventually reunites with this main path but please note that it involves a rather tricky descent.

The monument consists of a three-metre tall gritstone column with a 30Β cm ball on top. It was erected in 1810 in honour of Admiral Lord Nelson, who had died at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, by a local businessman from Baslow called John Brightman. Close by are the Three Ships, large outcrops of gritstone carved with the names of three of Nelson's 27 ships of the line at Trafalgar (none of which were lost) - Victory, Defiance and Royal Soverin (sic).

9. Emerging beside the B6050 turn right and walk down to the pub and then right again at the junction, following the roadside pavement past a smallholding.

Β 

10. Just before a footpath on the right, cross over the main road, with care, to a gap in the hedge. Descend a series of steep steps and cross over Heathy Lea Brook.

At a crossroads of paths turn right and walk past the gas-pipe post and telegraph pole to a stile beside a five-bar gate and follow a concessionary track and path through the Chatsworth Estate.

11. After crossing a field and high wall stiles you will enter the deer park. Bear right and head downhill. Look out for Jubilee Rock which is located close to a tree on your left. Also known as the Elephant Stone, this large boulder was inscribed with part of the National Anthem by Lieutenant Colonel Wrench to commemorate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.

Β 

12. Go over a fence stile to the left of double gates and walk straight ahead across the grass. Cross over a drive which leads to the Golden Gates away to your right. Turn left on meeting the high perimeter fence and follow this to the famous Cannon Kissing Gate of 1999. Inspired by Mrs Jill Cannon, it provides access to the park for visitors in wheelchairs.

13. Walk along the lovely footpath to return to Baslow. Along here are properties that belong to the Chatsworth Estate, as evidenced by their distinctive blue paintwork.

14. Pass a quaint thatched cottage, a rarity in this part of North Derbyshire, and go left over the bridge to return to the car park.

It is a different route to the one that I took, but I am unable to find that route. If I was able to remember the route I took, I would share it with you because at a certain point along the hike, we stopped for lunch and the view we had overlooked Chatsworth House.

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31 minutes ago, Elated Homoromantic said:

With the peake district, I recommend doing the 'three ships' walk (I honestly don't know why it is called the 'three ships')

Here is the best route to take:

1. From the car park go over to Goose Green and then the pedestrian crossing beyond to head up Eaton Hill.

On land to your right once stood Baslow's Grand Hotel and Hydro which was constructed in 1881. It provided hydropathic services even though it is said the local spring water lacked the health-giving minerals of neighbouring spas in the towns of Buxton and Matlock. There were tennis courts, a 9-hole golf course and landscaped gardens, all of which disappeared following the demolition of the building in 1936. Reminders of its existence are the otherwise curiously named Hydro Cottage and Hydro Close.

2. At the junction with a triangular-shaped island, turn right up Bar Road just after a pair of impressive gate posts that formed an entrance to the aforementioned Hydro. Ascend what was long ago the old coach road to Sheffield, passing Lady Wall Well on the left after the last of the houses. This natural water supply would have been where carriage-, cart- and packhorses could take a drink on their long climb to high ground.

3. After passing through a gate to enter moorland on the approach to Baslow Edge, turn right and follow a partly fallen wall and fencing on a path beneath Jack Flatt that leads into woodland scattered with moss-coated rocks lying haphazardly beneath a canopy of corkscrew oak and silver birch.

4. Continue on the path as it descends to cross a narrow bridge over Bar Brook, beside tucked-away houses that are surrounded by wonderful gardens of flowering shrubs and specimen trees.

5. Cross over the A621 Sheffield Road to a stile on the left of the former toll cottage and follow a well-walked footpath beneath Gardom's Edge.

6. Arriving at a gateway and stone post stile, turn left. Keeping the wall on your right, follow a path leading towards the top of Gardom's Edge.

7. After passing through a narrow stone gateway you will see piles of stones known as the Three Men.

Go over a wall stile on your right to enter access land and head toward Birchen Edge keeping a wall on your right. To your left is an area of beautiful mature silver birch trees with 'bonsai' baby birch in the foreground.

8. Just beyond a very large gritstone rock you will find a good path. Turn right and follow this for an easier route to the Robin Hood pub. Alternatively, go straight ahead on a narrow path to the trig point on Birchen Edge and turn right to visit Nelson's Monument and the Three Ships standing stones. The detour path eventually reunites with this main path but please note that it involves a rather tricky descent.

The monument consists of a three-metre tall gritstone column with a 30Β cm ball on top. It was erected in 1810 in honour of Admiral Lord Nelson, who had died at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, by a local businessman from Baslow called John Brightman. Close by are the Three Ships, large outcrops of gritstone carved with the names of three of Nelson's 27 ships of the line at Trafalgar (none of which were lost) - Victory, Defiance and Royal Soverin (sic).

9. Emerging beside the B6050 turn right and walk down to the pub and then right again at the junction, following the roadside pavement past a smallholding.

10. Just before a footpath on the right, cross over the main road, with care, to a gap in the hedge. Descend a series of steep steps and cross over Heathy Lea Brook.

At a crossroads of paths turn right and walk past the gas-pipe post and telegraph pole to a stile beside a five-bar gate and follow a concessionary track and path through the Chatsworth Estate.

11. After crossing a field and high wall stiles you will enter the deer park. Bear right and head downhill. Look out for Jubilee Rock which is located close to a tree on your left. Also known as the Elephant Stone, this large boulder was inscribed with part of the National Anthem by Lieutenant Colonel Wrench to commemorate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.

12. Go over a fence stile to the left of double gates and walk straight ahead across the grass. Cross over a drive which leads to the Golden Gates away to your right. Turn left on meeting the high perimeter fence and follow this to the famous Cannon Kissing Gate of 1999. Inspired by Mrs Jill Cannon, it provides access to the park for visitors in wheelchairs.

13. Walk along the lovely footpath to return to Baslow. Along here are properties that belong to the Chatsworth Estate, as evidenced by their distinctive blue paintwork.

14. Pass a quaint thatched cottage, a rarity in this part of North Derbyshire, and go left over the bridge to return to the car park.

It is a different route to the one that I took, but I am unable to find that route. If I was able to remember the route I took, I would share it with you because at a certain point along the hike, we stopped for lunch and the view we had overlooked Chatsworth House.

Wow, how detailed 😯

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On 1/30/2022 at 4:21 PM, Elated Homoromantic said:

With the peake district, I recommend doing the 'three ships' walk (I honestly don't know why it is called the 'three ships')

Here is the best route to take:

1. From the car park go over to Goose Green and then the pedestrian crossing beyond to head up Eaton Hill.

On land to your right once stood Baslow's Grand Hotel and Hydro which was constructed in 1881. It provided hydropathic services even though it is said the local spring water lacked the health-giving minerals of neighbouring spas in the towns of Buxton and Matlock. There were tennis courts, a 9-hole golf course and landscaped gardens, all of which disappeared following the demolition of the building in 1936. Reminders of its existence are the otherwise curiously named Hydro Cottage and Hydro Close.

2. At the junction with a triangular-shaped island, turn right up Bar Road just after a pair of impressive gate posts that formed an entrance to the aforementioned Hydro. Ascend what was long ago the old coach road to Sheffield, passing Lady Wall Well on the left after the last of the houses. This natural water supply would have been where carriage-, cart- and packhorses could take a drink on their long climb to high ground.

3. After passing through a gate to enter moorland on the approach to Baslow Edge, turn right and follow a partly fallen wall and fencing on a path beneath Jack Flatt that leads into woodland scattered with moss-coated rocks lying haphazardly beneath a canopy of corkscrew oak and silver birch.

4. Continue on the path as it descends to cross a narrow bridge over Bar Brook, beside tucked-away houses that are surrounded by wonderful gardens of flowering shrubs and specimen trees.

5. Cross over the A621 Sheffield Road to a stile on the left of the former toll cottage and follow a well-walked footpath beneath Gardom's Edge.

6. Arriving at a gateway and stone post stile, turn left. Keeping the wall on your right, follow a path leading towards the top of Gardom's Edge.

7. After passing through a narrow stone gateway you will see piles of stones known as the Three Men.

Go over a wall stile on your right to enter access land and head toward Birchen Edge keeping a wall on your right. To your left is an area of beautiful mature silver birch trees with 'bonsai' baby birch in the foreground.

8. Just beyond a very large gritstone rock you will find a good path. Turn right and follow this for an easier route to the Robin Hood pub. Alternatively, go straight ahead on a narrow path to the trig point on Birchen Edge and turn right to visit Nelson's Monument and the Three Ships standing stones. The detour path eventually reunites with this main path but please note that it involves a rather tricky descent.

The monument consists of a three-metre tall gritstone column with a 30Β cm ball on top. It was erected in 1810 in honour of Admiral Lord Nelson, who had died at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, by a local businessman from Baslow called John Brightman. Close by are the Three Ships, large outcrops of gritstone carved with the names of three of Nelson's 27 ships of the line at Trafalgar (none of which were lost) - Victory, Defiance and Royal Soverin (sic).

9. Emerging beside the B6050 turn right and walk down to the pub and then right again at the junction, following the roadside pavement past a smallholding.

10. Just before a footpath on the right, cross over the main road, with care, to a gap in the hedge. Descend a series of steep steps and cross over Heathy Lea Brook.

At a crossroads of paths turn right and walk past the gas-pipe post and telegraph pole to a stile beside a five-bar gate and follow a concessionary track and path through the Chatsworth Estate.

11. After crossing a field and high wall stiles you will enter the deer park. Bear right and head downhill. Look out for Jubilee Rock which is located close to a tree on your left. Also known as the Elephant Stone, this large boulder was inscribed with part of the National Anthem by Lieutenant Colonel Wrench to commemorate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.

12. Go over a fence stile to the left of double gates and walk straight ahead across the grass. Cross over a drive which leads to the Golden Gates away to your right. Turn left on meeting the high perimeter fence and follow this to the famous Cannon Kissing Gate of 1999. Inspired by Mrs Jill Cannon, it provides access to the park for visitors in wheelchairs.

13. Walk along the lovely footpath to return to Baslow. Along here are properties that belong to the Chatsworth Estate, as evidenced by their distinctive blue paintwork.

14. Pass a quaint thatched cottage, a rarity in this part of North Derbyshire, and go left over the bridge to return to the car park.

It is a different route to the one that I took, but I am unable to find that route. If I was able to remember the route I took, I would share it with you because at a certain point along the hike, we stopped for lunch and the view we had overlooked Chatsworth House.

Thanks for this! :)Β 

digital-mentor.png.37594766624d87064910e

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On 1/30/2022 at 11:21 AM, TheOriginalAxel said:

With the peake district, I recommend doing the 'three ships' walk (I honestly don't know why it is called the 'three ships')

Here is the best route to take:

1. From the car park go over to Goose Green and then the pedestrian crossing beyond to head up Eaton Hill.

On land to your right once stood Baslow's Grand Hotel and Hydro which was constructed in 1881. It provided hydropathic services even though it is said the local spring water lacked the health-giving minerals of neighbouring spas in the towns of Buxton and Matlock. There were tennis courts, a 9-hole golf course and landscaped gardens, all of which disappeared following the demolition of the building in 1936. Reminders of its existence are the otherwise curiously named Hydro Cottage and Hydro Close.

2. At the junction with a triangular-shaped island, turn right up Bar Road just after a pair of impressive gate posts that formed an entrance to the aforementioned Hydro. Ascend what was long ago the old coach road to Sheffield, passing Lady Wall Well on the left after the last of the houses. This natural water supply would have been where carriage-, cart- and packhorses could take a drink on their long climb to high ground.

3. After passing through a gate to enter moorland on the approach to Baslow Edge, turn right and follow a partly fallen wall and fencing on a path beneath Jack Flatt that leads into woodland scattered with moss-coated rocks lying haphazardly beneath a canopy of corkscrew oak and silver birch.

4. Continue on the path as it descends to cross a narrow bridge over Bar Brook, beside tucked-away houses that are surrounded by wonderful gardens of flowering shrubs and specimen trees.

5. Cross over the A621 Sheffield Road to a stile on the left of the former toll cottage and follow a well-walked footpath beneath Gardom's Edge.

6. Arriving at a gateway and stone post stile, turn left. Keeping the wall on your right, follow a path leading towards the top of Gardom's Edge.

7. After passing through a narrow stone gateway you will see piles of stones known as the Three Men.

Go over a wall stile on your right to enter access land and head toward Birchen Edge keeping a wall on your right. To your left is an area of beautiful mature silver birch trees with 'bonsai' baby birch in the foreground.

8. Just beyond a very large gritstone rock you will find a good path. Turn right and follow this for an easier route to the Robin Hood pub. Alternatively, go straight ahead on a narrow path to the trig point on Birchen Edge and turn right to visit Nelson's Monument and the Three Ships standing stones. The detour path eventually reunites with this main path but please note that it involves a rather tricky descent.

The monument consists of a three-metre tall gritstone column with a 30Β cm ball on top. It was erected in 1810 in honour of Admiral Lord Nelson, who had died at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, by a local businessman from Baslow called John Brightman. Close by are the Three Ships, large outcrops of gritstone carved with the names of three of Nelson's 27 ships of the line at Trafalgar (none of which were lost) - Victory, Defiance and Royal Soverin (sic).

9. Emerging beside the B6050 turn right and walk down to the pub and then right again at the junction, following the roadside pavement past a smallholding.

10. Just before a footpath on the right, cross over the main road, with care, to a gap in the hedge. Descend a series of steep steps and cross over Heathy Lea Brook.

At a crossroads of paths turn right and walk past the gas-pipe post and telegraph pole to a stile beside a five-bar gate and follow a concessionary track and path through the Chatsworth Estate.

11. After crossing a field and high wall stiles you will enter the deer park. Bear right and head downhill. Look out for Jubilee Rock which is located close to a tree on your left. Also known as the Elephant Stone, this large boulder was inscribed with part of the National Anthem by Lieutenant Colonel Wrench to commemorate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.

12. Go over a fence stile to the left of double gates and walk straight ahead across the grass. Cross over a drive which leads to the Golden Gates away to your right. Turn left on meeting the high perimeter fence and follow this to the famous Cannon Kissing Gate of 1999. Inspired by Mrs Jill Cannon, it provides access to the park for visitors in wheelchairs.

13. Walk along the lovely footpath to return to Baslow. Along here are properties that belong to the Chatsworth Estate, as evidenced by their distinctive blue paintwork.

14. Pass a quaint thatched cottage, a rarity in this part of North Derbyshire, and go left over the bridge to return to the car park.

It is a different route to the one that I took, but I am unable to find that route. If I was able to remember the route I took, I would share it with you because at a certain point along the hike, we stopped for lunch and the view we had overlooked Chatsworth House.

Thanks! I'll see if I can go!

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